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About This Breed


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One of the biggest advantages of purchasing a pedigreed cat is that you will know the personality and characteristics of the breed. This helps you in choosing the breed that will best fit into your home, family, and lifestyle.

The European Burmese is a very affectionate, intelligent, and loyal cat. They thrive on companionship and will want to be with you, participating in everything you do. While they might pick a favorite family member, chances are that they will interact with everyone in the home, as well as any visitors that come to call. They are inquisitive and playful, even as adults. Expect them to be in your lap whenever you sit down and snuggle up next to you in bed. They become fast friends to other cats and even dogs, making them the perfect addition to your family.

Taking care of a European Burmese is very easy. They do not require bathing, and regular grooming with a rubbertype brush will keep shedding under control. “Scratching” is a natural behavior for all cats, so a scratching post should be provided. Sharp claws can also be trimmed with clippers. Keeping such a rare treasure indoors and neutering or spaying are all essential elements for giving your European Burmese a healthy, long, and joyful life.

The European Burmese is a medium sized, shorthaired cat of far eastern origins. Body type is elegant with gently rounded contours, solid boning, and excellent musculature. Eyes are large, alert, and expressive, with color ranging from yellow to amber. Coat colors include brown, chocolate, blue, lilac, cream, and a soft apricot red. Tortoiseshell colors are also popular.

The European Burmese and the Burmese we know in North America originated from the same source – Wong Mau, the first Burmese introduced to the Western world by Dr. Thompson in 1930. As Wong Mau was the only example of her type, she had to be mated to another breed of similar type. The obvious choice then was the Siamese. Resulting litters revealed that Wong Mau herself carried a pointed gene, as kittens in her litters were both solid and pointed in color.

The solids were selected for further propagation of the breed. From the United States, the breed spread east to the United Kingdom, where the same lack of breeding stock led again to the introduction of the Siamese. From then on, the breed followed different courses of development; today we have two very different looking cats with two different standards, both sharing a common ancestry.

The most obvious difference between the breeds is the array of colors displayed by the European Burmese – ten to be exact. Introduction of the red gene is responsible for the additional colors. This gene was introduced both deliberately and by accident. In the U.K., Siamese come in many colors, including red points, so the introduction of this gene to the existing four colors (brown, chocolate, blue, and lilac) produced the colors red, cream, brown-tortie, chocolatetortie, blue-tortie, and lilac-tortie.

There is also a difference in type between the two Burmese breeds. The European Burmese is an elegant, moderate cat with gently rounded contours, whereas the Burmese has a compact, well rounded appearance. The eye shape differs between the two breeds. The European Burmese should have eyes with a top line that is slightly curved, with a slant towards the nose. The lower line should be rounded. The Burmese eyes should have a rounded aperture.

If you think that a European Burmese would be a good fit for your family, you’re probably wondering what the next step will be to find one. Many breeders have web sites and are also listed in national publications. Doing an Internet search should help you find a breeder close to you. Kittens are usually ready to leave their mom at the age of 12 to 16 weeks. Being with mom and siblings this long helps them develop the physical and emotional stability needed for their move to a new environment. They will also have received their first set of vaccinations by 12 weeks. Pricing will depend on type (show quality or pet quality) and may vary depending on location. Some kittens might come from Grand Champion (GC), National (NW), National Breed (BW), and/or Regional (RW) winning parentage. This may also influence the price of the kitten. Often times, breeders will have adult cats available for adoption, too. These cats are usually retired show kitties and are ready to be in a forever home. Whether you choose a kitten or an older cat, you are sure to have many wonderful years ahead of you with your European Burmese! For more information, please contact the Breed Council Secretary for this breed.